Having the right principal in place is as important as retention

Maureen Downey wrote this article this week about whether we are focusing enough on principal quality. The references she makes refer to who to retain principals and how busy the job is.

From my experience in DeKalb County, it’s been less about how to keep good principals and more about what to do about the really awful ones? No one seems to fire teachers….not sure what that is about. Last year there was a great uproar over the Principal at Southwest DeKalb HS. She was simply transferred to another school (so she can torment another whole set of parents, students and staff?). Avondale Elementary School had an awful principal for almost 10 years. That principal was the reason the Museum Charter School was created. That principal finally left at the end of 2013-2014 school year. The new principal is fantastic, and I am not concerned about him staying because he is building great roots in the community.

I’m concerned about the lack of principal accountability by regional superintendents and the shuffling of principals to other schools when they probably should be fired. Why can’t we fire principals? For a non union state, sure seems like those protections are in place – that or extreme nepotism!

I know that DeKalb Schools recently received grant money to support training and accountability for regional superintendents who supervise our principals. Looks like I’ll need to check in on that and see what progress has been made.

Another issue that Maureen doesn’t bring up regarding the role of principals and turnover is the being principal is an administrator role vs an educator role. It’s more commonly accepted that principals spend time teaching before they become a principal. While that experience is truly helpful in understanding the teaching side of the school business, it does not really assist with the business side of the school. Managing staff, outside relationships, parents, all the administrative work, budgeting – the business side of the job is often more difficult for principals who haven’t had a great deal of complementary experience.